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Tufts Crisis Mapping Class » Entries tagged with "UNICEF"

UNICEF Conclusions

Originally in our project design, we assumed that our long-term goals would be implemented much later after the earthquake occurred, but foundation building would be useful if not effective soon after the crisis has occurred. In the simulation, many people were reporting that it wasn’t just food and water that they were lacking, it was money and something to occupy themselves with. If these people are internally displaced and the city has been ravaged, they don’t have anything to occupy themselves with. If we were to change our plan, we would likely dive into the foundation building in a shorter time frame than we had originally thought in order to limit the long term damage. We also have to take into consideration that our supplemental meal plan may not be as … Read entire article »

Filed under: Crisis Mapping, Disaster Management, Humanitarian Action

UNICEF & Crowdmap

UNICEF Morocco: http://unicefclass.crowdmap.com/main In response to the devastating earthquake in Rabat, UNICEF Morocco has pledged its time and resources to citizens of the city. After receiving information from the UN SMS campaign, we decided to compile a map because it would help us to focus our efforts and be more effective in providing our partner NGOs throughout the city with necessary information. However, many of the difficulties we faced were due to our limited knowledge of the protocols aid workers are expected to follow. This was a highly important realization for our team: if crisis mappers reject certain information or suggest certain actions, there will be real world consequences. There is great potential for this online community to help, but without reflection and training, there is also much vulnerability to harmful mistakes. Some instances … Read entire article »

Filed under: Crisis Mapping, Disaster Management, Featured, Technology

UNICEF Morocco & Our Plan

Challenges faced: One of the biggest challenges we faced while we worked on the initial project was avoiding mission creep. As one of the only groups with a solidified based on the ground, there was a strong temptation for us to try and play a bigger role than was perhaps appropriate, given the actual size of our ranks. More importantly, doing so would have compromised our work with our target group, children and women, by focusing our work in areas unmatched with our specific expertise. Another challenge we confronted was making sure that our approach was sufficiently holistic; we wanted to ensure that we were taking all cultural, political, economic and logistical factors into consideration. We realized the high stakes nature of this exercise: if one factor is neglected, it has the … Read entire article »

Filed under: Crisis Mapping